How To Go About Booking Lodges Near Popular National Parks – Part 2

How To Go About Booking Lodges Near Popular National Parks – Part 2

This article is a continuation of the national park lodges post How To Go About Booking Lodges Near Popular National Parks – Part 1.

Keep Your Dates Flexible

When making reservations at national park lodges, it’s best (if possible) to book rooms during the weekdays and/or on dates that do not coincide with national holidays, particularly Labor Day, the Fourth of July, and Memorial Day. Traveling to national parks on weekends during peak season or on holidays will put you right in the thick of the busiest times of the year. If you prefer to avoid large crowds, long waits, and walking past or through hundreds or even thousands of people, stick to weekdays and non-holidays. One secret is to plan trips for the days immediately following major holidays. Lots of vacancies typically exist then. And never underestimate the off-season months, particularly when staying in national park lodges in warm climates (Zion National Park, for example). Visiting Zion during the off-season is almost no different then visiting during the busy months, minus the crowds and no vacancy signs. Note: it is important to remember that some national park lodges are not open during the off-season. Many are, though, enough that you shouldn’t have any problems booking rooms for the dates you desire.

Be Willing To Go With Plan B

We mentioned the value of being flexible with your dates in Part 1, but flexibility will also serve you well when applied to the national park lodges you want to book. Some travelers have a particular place that they prefer to stay and nothing else will do. But if you’re open to staying somewhere else when your first preferred option isn’t available, you will open yourself to new experiences, possibly a new favorite lodge, and certainly options for your desired dates. The cities in and around most national parks have many different incredible national park lodges that all offer something unique. One technique that some travelers use, particularly those who visit the same national park on a regular basis, involves booking single rooms at two or three national park lodges for the same night and then subsequently trying to snag a cancellation or two as their travel dates approach in an attempt to end up with multiple rooms at the same place. This is risky and typically is only a worthwhile endeavor when staying at parks where many national park lodges share the same reservation system. Again, some people swear by these method and others baulk at it, but at least you now know it’s used by some and can make the decision on its effectiveness for yourself.

A willingness to go with Plan B also involves perhaps giving up (at least initially) a desirable amenity such as a room without a private bath in hopes that as your date approaches and you keep checking, you may, in the end, get the type of room you truly want. If you don’t end up with it, at least you got the reservation at your national park lodge of choice.

Be Persistent

If you’re willing to take the little extra time to seek after cancellations, get yourself of waiting lists, and stay on top of the reservation game, you will increase your chances of emerging victorious. Cancellations happen frequently; quite frequently, in fact. Stay on the ball and maintain your determination to create for yourself the vacation you’ve envisioned. Another important aspect of booking national park lodges is to not put all your trust in third party booking sites like Kayak.com, Booking.com, Hotels.com, etc. Though these sites are wonderful, calling establishments directly more often gets travelers what they’re looking for in these circumstances. Some hotels do not make their room inventory viewable on their site so calling and speaking to a real person is a larger step to success.

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How To Go About Booking Lodges Near Popular National Parks – Part 2

National Park Lodges

Article by Clear Content Marketing